Model of a confectioner’s workshop, 1935

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Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Collection Area
Production Technology
Collection
Food, Beverages and Tobacco
Epoch
1930 - 1939
At the moment this object is not published in the museum.
Mmmh – how mouth-watering is this: doughnuts, croissants, Guglhupf, Cremeschnitten [cream slices], chocolate torte, hazelnut pastries, poppyseed cake, confectionery – and it’s the confectioner that makes them all. And lots more besides.

While a baker will use bread dough to make bread and bread rolls, the confectioner (or pâtissier) is in charge of pastries, which classically comprise cakes, tortes, and biscuits. But of course there are areas where these two professions overlap.

In Europe the confectioner’s craft quickly gained in popularity after the cultivation and industrial processing of sugar beet in the 19th century. Prior to that, sugar made from sugar cane was an expensive colonial produce and a luxury item. Sugar beet meant that there was now sufficient sweetener available from domestic production at increasingly affordable prices. Alongside traditional honey gingerbread, sweet cakes and pastries such as sponge cakes and pound cakes became a commercial success and were essential accompaniments for tea and coffee, likewise ‘new’ beverages.

The model at the Technisches Museum Wien dates from 1935 and shows the fittings and furnishings of a confectioner’s workshop that were still driven by transmission. Dough kneaders, mixers and grinders on the front wall were not fitted with their own autonomous drives (e.g. electric motors); instead, the driving force was transferred to the individual machines from a central source using shafts and belts. By contrast the dough kneading machine next to the oven on the longitudinal wall already has its own individual drive, albeit still belt-driven. Next to it is the Frigomat electric refrigeration and a series of framed (warning) notices such as Zuerst denken, dann sagen. Zuerst wägen, dann wagen.  [Think before you speak. Weigh it up before you weigh it out.] - Reinlichkeit ist Pflicht. [Cleanliness is a duty.] - Jedes Ding an seinen Ort. Erspart viel Zeit, Müh u. Wort. [Each thing in its place saves a lot of time, effort and talk.] And, clearly, Rauchen verboten [No smoking] is not an invention of our day.

This small model on a scale of 1:10 was originally a working model, i.e. the belt-driven machines could be demonstrated in action.

Manufacturer: Unknown
Production date: 1935



Inv.Nr. 11473

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