Model of a steam brewhouse, 1959

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Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Bild
© Technisches Museum Wien, Photo: Peter Sedlaczek
Collection Area
Production Technology
Collection
Food, Beverages and Tobacco
Epoch
1950 - 1959
At the moment this object is not published in the museum.
The brewhouse is the heart of any brewery. Here the brew is not quite yet beer, but this is where the wort it needs for its fermentation is added. Hops and malt are not lost here. On the contrary.

Malting, mash, original wort, brewers’ grains – these are all terms familiar to us from the art of brewing. But let’s take one thing at a time. The ‘barley juice’ is first created in the malthouse. This is where the barley is left to germinate in water, a process known as malting; the green malt obtained as a result is then dried in a kiln and the malt is then milled to produce malt grist.

Next up is the mash tun, where the malt and the brewing water are blended (mash) and then heated, converting the starch contained in the malt into malt sugar. The mash is then filtered (purified). The solid components (i.e. the spent grains) are used as cattle feed; the clear liquid wort itself is fed back into the brewing pan. This is where the hops come into play, with the wort cooked along with the hops. The ‘original wort’ is now ready. It has to be freed of any undissolved components and then left to cool. At this point we leave the brewhouse and head for the cellar.

Now this is where the beer becomes beer. The wort is mixed with yeast in large fermenting tanks and left to ferment, with the sugar obtained converting itself into alcohol. This is followed by the storage process, possibly a final filtering stage, and the filling of the beer. And those are the basic processes involved in brewing beer. The huge variety of beers is due to the individual raw materials and formulations.

The model at the Technisches Museum Wien dates from 1959 and shows a brewing house, the heart of the brewery. The huge copper vats (brewing pans) are clearly visible. The exhibit inscription reads: ‘Model of the steam brewhouse for 8,000 kg of grist at Vienna’s Schwechat Brewery’. In other words, eight tonnes of malt were processed into wort here, using almost 500 hectolitres (50,000 litres) of water in a single brewing process. As they say in German: Hopfen und Malz, Gott erhalt’s! – God save hops and malt!

Donated by: Association of Breweries, Vienna
Manufacturer: A. Ziemann GmbH, Ludwigsburg (Germany)
Production date: 1959

Inv.Nr. 16935

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