• 50936-000_17006241_PersonenmonitorZwentendorf.jpg Personenmonitor F.-Nr. 7513 Typ 42 mit Rückwand, hergestellt 1975 von der Hartmann und Braun AG, übernommen von der Gemeinschaftskraftwerk Tullnerfeld GmbH, 1999, © Technisches Museum Wien
  • 50936-000_17006243_PersonenmonitorZwentendorf.jpg Personenmonitor F.-Nr. 7513 Typ 42 mit Rückwand, hergestellt 1975 von der Hartmann und Braun AG, übernommen von der Gemeinschaftskraftwerk Tullnerfeld GmbH, 1999, © Technisches Museum Wien
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Body monitor from the Zwentendorf nuclear power plant

This body monitor for measuring radioactive substances on people’s clothing and skin was located at the entrance to the radiation-protected area of the Zwentendorf nuclear power plant (a.k.a. Tullnerfeld nuclear power plant). Plant personnel would use the monitor when entering and leaving the facility to check they were not contaminated with radioactive substances. While personal protection was the primary purpose, the aim was also to prevent personnel bringing any contamination into the plant from the outside, which would have triggered an alarm and unnecessarily interrupted the plant’s operations.

By 1978 the nuclear power plant at Zwentendorf was ready for operation and even its uranium fuel rods were already on site. The radiation protection measures in place for all plant personnel were already fully implemented. But a referendum held on 5 November 1978 resulted in a wafer-thin majority of 30,068 votes against the use of nuclear power in Austria, and so the power plant never went into operation.



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