Getting to grips with the concept of space

The interactive stations

Part of SPACE - THE EXHIBITION

Test
Remember
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Tellurion

A model of our heliocentric vision of the universe

© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Rossboth
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Spacecurl

Three-dimensional training and therapy Equipment
© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Preiss
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The myth of spin-offs

We owe the existence of these household products to the special developments of space travel
© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Preiss
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Mars rover

Become a Mars explorer
© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Preiss
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Biosphere

Take control of the setup procedure for your base on Mars 
© Technisches Museum Wien
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Folio

Supernatural book
© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Rossboth
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Bottle Rocket

Newton´s third law of Motion 
© Technisches Museum Wien
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Build your own alien

Observe how the appearance of the extra-terrestrial evolves
© Technisches Museum Wien
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Docking simulator

Practise a docking manoeuvre with the ISS international space Station
© Technisches Museum Wien/APA-Fotoservice/Preiss
Exhibition
SPACE - THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition’s interactive stations invite you to focus close-up on the achievements of space travel. Put your astronaut skills to the test by checking out the Spacecurl and the Docking Station, explore the surface of Mars with a Mars Rover, or create your very own virtual alien.

Tellurion

A tellurion is a model of our heliocentric vision of the universe. It shows the movements of the Earth and the Moon around the Sun, an insight that was long a controversial issue. The fixed source of light represents the Sun; the Earth and the Moon are mobile. The Sun shines on both. The tellurion illustrates how day and night as well as natural phenomena are caused, e.g. the seasons, the phases of the Moon, and lunar eclipses on the Earth.

Instructions
Press the blue buttons to simulate the different positions of the Earth and Moon relative to the Sun.

 

Spacecurl

The Spacecurl allows you to float completely freely within a given space. It simulates the body’s sense of disorientation in space. The body is able to revolve and rotate in every direction – and even around its own axis! – without being restrained by the Earth’s gravitational pull. NASA developed the Spacecurl as training equipment so astronauts could practise their movements under zero gravity conditions.

Instructions
Step into the Spacecurl and wait to be strapped in. Then try and move in any direction by shifting your weight or tensing your muscles.

 

The myth of spin-offs

Some technological developments of space travel find their way into everyday products as spin-offs. But not everything that has “space” stamped on it was actually initially developed for space use. Some products existed long before space travel, giving rise to myths about spin-offs that never were.

Instructions
Affixed to our Spin-off Wall are various objects that are used more or less in everyday life. Some are space travel spin-offs; others pretend to be. Short descriptions of selected objects are displayed on the monitor. Your task is to decide if they are true, or utter nonsense.

 

Mars rover

Mars rovers are rolling research labs. Remote-controlled from Earth they make their way across the surface of Mars, analysing it in the process. The huge distance between Earth and Mars makes it difficult to control a rover. Indeed, the radio signal can take up to 20 minutes to reach Mars. That’s why rovers are built to be able to avoid obstacles by themselves.

Instructions
Control our Mars rover from the command bridge, avoid obstacles, and use the analyser on the back of the rover to analyse rock samples.

 

Biosphere

For human beings to be able to survive on Mars they must first create a living environment (biosphere). At a Mars base station, special facilities generate the necessary resources such as oxygen, water, food and fuel for the return flight. However, the site for the Mars base has to be chosen carefully as not every site is suitable.

Instructions
From the command bridge you have control of the setup procedure for your Mars base. Follow the instructions given by the on-board computer and make all the right decisions; that way nothing will stand in the way of your mission’s success.

 

Folio

The wondrous and the supernatural remained an integral part of the universe during the Baroque period. Period illustrations in novels as well as in scientific works often feature the Church doctrine. They also often portray the laws of science as God’s laws. After all, it was He who co-ordinated all the movements in the universe and kept the planets in their orbits.

Instructions
Touch the supernatural in the illustrations and find out more about the wondrous processes in the universe during the Baroque period. Indeed, despite the scientific findings and the laws of nature, the solar system remained filled with the supernatural.

 

Bottle rocket

Rockets use recoil to propel themselves forwards, in accordance with Newton’s third law of motion. Put very simply, the law states that any force always exerts an equal and opposite force. So the combustion of fuel inside a rocket generates an enormous amount of pressure that can only be released outwards through the rocket nozzle. This in turn generates thrust in the opposite direction, which pushes the rocket forwards.

Instructions
Pump the mechanism several times to build up the pressure inside the rocket. Next press the button. This triggers the recoil that causes the rocket to shoot upwards. To be able to fly forwards the rocket has to expel the pressure to the back. The more you pump, the greater the force expelled by the rocket, which in turn makes it fly faster and higher.

 

Build your own alien

Ambient conditions such as temperature, gravitational pull, surface structure, and the composition of the atmosphere can vary greatly from one planet to the next. They determine the appearance of extra-terrestrials on these planets; after all, living beings adapt to their environment.

Instructions
Change the different ambient conditions of the planet and observe how the appearance of the extra-terrestrial evolves.

 

Docking simulator

Astronauts use a simulator to practise the docking manoeuvre to the ISS international space station. After all, once they’re in space, nothing must go wrong. First the space capsule is brought into the same orbit as the ISS. Once they have visual contact, astronauts also have the option to dock with the space station manually.

Instructions
Move the right joystick to steer the Soyuz capsule up, down, left or right. The left joystick lets you fly the capsule forwards and backwards. Beware: the fuel supply is limited! But don’t try and be too quick or your docking manoeuvre will fail.

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